WCCS Roast featuring Bill Decken

The Sherman chapter of World Congress of Chiropractic Students (WCCS) hosted its first Annual Roast featuring Bill Decken, the "Nerve Supply Guy." The club did this event in the hopes to raise money to attend the WCCS being held in South Africa this year. 

The local chapter also has hopes to send students to WCCS meeting in Barcelona, Spain the next year. Club President Morgan Iloncaie is currently drafting a proposal to have philosophy be a required part of the curriculum at each chiropractic college. If this were passed by the WCCS, it would go a long way in shifting the chiropractic profession towards a more principled approach. I believe this would improve the profession, but more importantly for now, what happened at the roast?

858The Team – Dr. Ron Castellucci,Dr. Bill Fehl, Dr. Joe Donofrio (left to right)

Dr. Robert Irwin moderated the event as Dr. Bill Fehl, Dr. Joe Donofrio, and Dr. Ron Castellucci took turns honoring Dr. Bill Decken through jesting. Here are some of the highlights:

  • 866Dr. Fehl was up first. He was wearing a NY hat along with a Hawaiian shirt in honor of Dr. Decken's normal attire
  • Dr. Fehl reminded everyone about the "strong New York" accent of Dr. Decken. (being from the North, I thought this was a stretch, but it was funny in context).

Dr. Fehl also gave some examples of outrageous test questions, to which the correct answer is always innate intelligence.

For example:

  • Why does my NFL player start sing the national anthem after an adjustment? — innate intelligence
  • Why does my patent feel the need to dance after an adjustment? — innate intelligence

Writing these statements down now don't seem as funny as when they were said at the roast. However, if you had Dr. Decken for a class, you understand that innate is always the right answer, so it was funny at the time.

Next, Dr. Joe Donofrio got the crowd laughing with some "you're so ugly" and "you're so dumb jokes." Some of the best examples:

  • 884"He is so ugly, he can correct a subluxation by looking at it."
  • "He is so ugly, he can only be adjusted in the prone position."
  • "Dr. Decken is so dumb, he asked me to help him put his M&Ms in alphabetical order"
  • "He is so dumb, even Dr. Castellucci failed him."
  • Dr. Joe also stated that for someone who doesn't believe in medicine, his voice is like a sleeping pill.

Dr. Joe also prepared a jibjab video showing a comical dive of a man in red speedo and gangnam style dance video with Dr. Decken's head in the video. It was in good taste.

Finally, Dr. Ron poked fun at Dr. Decken's favorite brands and franchises such as his love for Coke and M&M produces as well as his love for the Mets rather than the Yankees. These pranks involved several head cut outs with M&M bodies.

For example, Dr. Ron put up a picture like this and would comment "Dr. Decken taking it easy."Untitled

Overall, the night had many funny moments and the doctors were very generous to Dr. Decken. In his rebuttal, Dr. Decken had a few good jabs. His funniest jokes were directed at Dr. Ron for being a Logan College graduate. They were mostly directly at his experience with Logan Basic technique which involves touching the sacrotuberous ligament aka the buttock. It was a strong finish to a great night.

Signryan

Bill Decken, D.C., Receives Distinguished Service Award from Sherman College of Chiropractic

Dr. Bill Decken

Dr. Bill Decken

Chiropractor Bill Decken, D.C., has been honored with the Distinguished Service Award from Sherman College of Chiropractic in Spartanburg, SC. This award is given to Sherman graduates who have distinguished themselves with service to the community, the profession, and Sherman College.

“When you think about chiropractic philosophy and its present champions, chances are you’re going to think about Dr. Bill Decken, and for good reason,” said Sherman College President Edwin Cordero, D.C. “In addition to serving as Philosophy Department Chair and teaching countless chiropractic students in his philosophy classes, Dr. Decken developed and has been leading the college’s prestigious Academy of Chiropractic Philosophers [ACP] program,” he shared. Dr. Decken has played a key role in the ACP program’s expansion across the U.S. and worldwide – including recently completed courses in Chicago, Omaha, Australia and Sweden; next the program will travel to Rhode Island and Europe.

Dr. Decken is a 1986 honor graduate of Sherman College. He holds a bachelor’s degree in environmental science from Marist College (1979) and a Legion of Chiropractic Philosophers distinction from Palmer College of Chiropractic. He joined the Sherman College faculty in 1987 and is a professor of clinical sciences, teaching courses in philosophy, subluxation theory, and communication.

Dr. Decken is active in the profession, particularly through the ACP program, which benefits those in the profession who seek a greater understanding of chiropractic principles and their application in practice. He served seven years as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the International Federation of Chiropractors and Organizations, an office he held until December 2014. He often speaks on philosophy at chiropractic seminars.

Dr. Decken practices at Family Straight Chiropractic, which he established and has owned for 28 years, seeing patients from newborn to age 90. He attends Bethel Assembly of God, where he is treasurer, and enjoys bicycling and the outdoors. He and his wife, Grace, have four girls and one granddaughter.

Sherman College named its 2015 award recipients April 30-May 2 as part of Lyceum, an annual continuing education and homecoming event attended by hundreds of chiropractors throughout the U.S. and internationally. Lyceum is held on the college’s campus in Spartanburg, SC, and involves three days of seminars, special events and other programs.


For more information, please contact:
Karen Rhodes
Director of Public Relations
Sherman College of Chiropractic
Phone: 800-849-8771, ext. 242
krhodes@sherman.edu

Twenty-Five Complete Doctor of Chiropractic Program at Sherman College

Grads_06_2014

Twenty-five students from around the world received the doctor of chiropractic degree from Sherman College of Chiropractic in Spartanburg, SC, on Saturday, June 21, 2014. The commencement was a shared ceremony for June and September 2014 graduates.

Justin M. Berg of Illinois, recipient of the Milton W. Garfunkel Award, presented the farewell address to his classmates. The Garfunkel Award is the highest award given at graduation. Students receiving this honor must have a grade point average of 3.5 or above, and in addition, best exemplify those qualities Sherman College would like to inculcate in all of its graduates: love of the profession, an understanding of the philosophy, willingness to share, and service to the college and community.

Berg graduated summa cum laude and also received the Academic Achievement Award. The Academic Achievement Award is given to the individual in each graduating class who maintains the highest grade point average throughout his or her studies at Sherman College.

The Clinical Excellence Award was presented to Eric Nathan Goans of North Carolina for the June class and Gregory J. Russo of Georgia for the September class, in recognition of their successful practices in the Health Center. This award is given to an intern in each class who has diligently worked to develop skills in the art, science and philosophy of chiropractic, maintained an “A” average in the clinical program and exhibited superior overall clinical performance and professionalism.

Goans also received the B.J. Palmer Philosophy Distinction Award. This honor is given to outstanding students who exemplify the profound philosophical understanding necessary to translate the universal principles of life into the workable philosophy, science and art which is chiropractic.

Also during the ceremony, chiropractic advocate, author and speaker Keith Wassung was presented with the honorary Doctor of Chiropractic Humanities degree, a rare honor given by the college to noteworthy individuals.

The commencement address was given by Ronald R. Castellucci, D.C., associate professor of clinical sciences at Sherman College. Castellucci is a 1988 graduate of Logan College of Chiropractic in St. Louis, MO. After 10 years of successful practice in Lexington, MA, Castellucci moved south to join the Sherman College faculty in 1998. He also maintains a wellness-oriented family practice in Hendersonville, NC, and is a member of Sherman College’s prestigious Academy of Chiropractic Philosophers. Castellucci was named Faculty Member of the Year for 2013, 2004 and 2000. He teaches full spine techniques, spinal palpation and patient education. Castellucci teaches pediatric adjusting techniques worldwide for the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association.

William M. Decken, D.C., L.C.P., associate professor of clinical sciences and chair of the Philosophy Department at Sherman College, delivered the charge to the graduates. Decken is a 1986 cum laude graduate of Sherman College. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Marist College (1979) and a Legion of Chiropractic Philosophers distinction from Palmer College of Chiropractic. Decken joined the Sherman College faculty in 1987; he teaches courses in philosophy, subluxation theory, and communication. Since 2008 he has served as chairman of the International Federation of Chiropractors and Organizations, and he developed and coordinates Sherman College’s Academy of Chiropractic Philosophers program. He often speaks on philosophy at chiropractic seminars. Decken practices at Family Straight Chiropractic, which he established and has owned for 27 years.

The doctor of chiropractic program at Sherman College requires students to complete more than 4,800 hours (14 quarters) of classroom and laboratory study and also includes an internship in the college’s on-campus Chiropractic Health Center. To enter the D.C. program, students must have at least 90 semester hours of college-level courses, including courses in the sciences. 

Twenty-Seven Complete Doctor of Chiropractic Program at Sherman College

Grads_06_2013_withCordero

 

Twenty-seven students from around the world received the doctor of chiropractic degree from Sherman College of Chiropractic in Spartanburg, SC, on Saturday, December 14, 2013. The commencement was a shared ceremony for December 2013 and March 2014 graduates.

Guthrie Michael Schroeder of Maine and Chelsea Jeanne Sineath of South Carolina, recipients of the Milton W. Garfunkel Award for the December and March classes, respectively, each presented a farewell address to their classmates. The Garfunkel Award is the highest award given at graduation. Students receiving this honor must have a grade point average of 3.5 or above, and in addition, best exemplify those qualities Sherman College would like to inculcate in all of its graduates: love of the profession, an understanding of the philosophy, willingness to share, and service to the college and community.

Both Schroeder and Sineath graduated summa cum laude and received the Academic Achievement Award. The Academic Achievement Award is given to the individual in each graduating class who maintains the highest grade point average throughout his or her studies at Sherman College.

Casey Ann Bogart of Michigan received the Service Distinction Award for the December graduating class, and Sineath received it for the March class. The Service Distinction Award is not given at every graduation; rather it is given to students who stand out for their significant and distinguished service contributions to Sherman College and the local community throughout their course of study.

The Clinical Excellence Award was presented to Justin Scott Peasley of Michigan for the December class and Amanda Cristal Alejandro of New Jersey for the March class, in recognition of their successful practices in the Health Center. This award is given to an intern in each class who has diligently worked to develop skills in the art, science and philosophy of chiropractic, maintained an “A” average in the clinical program and exhibited superior overall clinical performance and professionalism.

The B.J. Palmer Philosophy Distinction Award was presented to the mother-and-son pair of Guthrie Schroeder for the December class and Diane Kraszewski Schroeder of Maine for the March class. This honor is given to outstanding students who exemplify the profound philosophical understanding necessary to translate the universal principles of life into the workable philosophy, science and art which is chiropractic.

The commencement address was given by Ronald R. Castellucci, D.C., associate professor of clinical sciences at Sherman College. Castellucci is a 1988 graduate of Logan College of Chiropractic in St. Louis, MO. After 10 years of successful practice in Lexington, MA, Castellucci moved south to join the Sherman College faculty in 1998. He also maintains a wellness-oriented family practice in Hendersonville, NC, and is a member of Sherman College’s prestigious Academy of Chiropractic Philosophers. Castellucci was named Faculty Member of the Year for 2013, 2004 and 2000. He teaches full spine techniques, spinal palpation and patient education. Castellucci teaches pediatric adjusting techniques worldwide for the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association.

William M. Decken, D.C., L.C.P., associate professor of clinical sciences and chair of the Philosophy Department at Sherman College, delivered the charge to the graduates. Decken is a 1986 cum laude graduate of Sherman College. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Marist College (1979) and a Legion of Chiropractic Philosophers distinction from Palmer College of Chiropractic. Decken joined the Sherman College faculty in 1987; he teaches courses in philosophy, subluxation theory, and communication. Since 2008 he has served as chairman of the International Federation of Chiropractors and Organizations, and he developed and coordinates Sherman College’s Academy of Chiropractic Philosophers program. He often speaks on philosophy at chiropractic seminars. Decken practices at Family Straight Chiropractic, which he established and has owned for 27 years.

The doctor of chiropractic program at Sherman College requires students to complete more than 4,800 hours (14 quarters) of classroom and laboratory study and also includes an internship in the college’s on-campus Chiropractic Health Center. To enter the D.C. program, students must have at least 90 semester hours of college-level courses, including courses in the sciences. 

How Does a _____ Remind You of Chiropractic?

First quarter Philosophy I final exam. Dr. Decken asked us to prepare an answer to a question about how any item or topic reminds us of chiropractic. It is an exercise that makes you think about how you can incorporate chiropractic into every situation, and prepares students to begin to think about patent education. The topic that we were given was how does a waiter/waitress remind you of chiropractic. I have since thought about this exercise several times.

Right now I am sitting in an airport. I can just imaging Dr. Decken sitting next to me asking me, “Melinda, how does an airport remind you of chiropractic?”

Well Dr. Decken, I am glad you asked. As I walk my daughters to the terminal at the airport we come upon the moving sidewalk. The sidewalk allows us to reach our terminal faster. The moving sidewalk reminds me of myelinated axons in the nervous system. As my husband walks next to us on the non-moving sidewalk I am reminded of the unmyelinated axons.

Airport

If both sidewalks are blocked we will not be able to reach our destination as fast or maybe even at all! The same is true in our body. Subluxation interferes with information reaching its target resulting in decreased function. Chiropractic can remove interference and allow the sidewalk to run again getting everyone where they need to go.

There are many more examples in an airport, and everyday life around us. Can you think of some?

Melinda

14th Annual IRAPS

14th Annual IRAPS

14th Annual IRAPS Gathers Leaders in Chiropractic Philosophy, Research Sherman College of Chiropractic recently hosted the 14th Annual International Research and Philosophy Symposium (IRAPS), a peer-reviewed conference on vertebral subluxation research and the...

Tenth International Research and Philosophy Symposium hosted by Sherman College

IRAPS-logo-color-2Renowned researchers and philosophers will join forces this October for the 10th
annual International Research and Philosophy Symposium (IRAPS) at Sherman
College of Chiropractic. The symposium is designed to bring together
individuals with different viewpoints and approaches and to promote critical
thinking in regard to the professional, philosophical, theoretical and
practical considerations of vertebral subluxation correction.

This year’s symposium will be held October 19-20 on Sherman College’s campus in
Spartanburg, South Carolina. Presentations are centered on topics such as
lexicon, philosophy, politics, education, clinical research, and methods of
analyzing and adjusting vertebral subluxation.

“The presenters and the crowd gathered in attendance at this event are always loaded
with high-caliber thinkers and doers in chiropractic,” says chiropractic
philosopher and author Rob Sinnott, D.C., DPhCS.

The keynote speaker for IRAPS 2013 is Craig M. Becker, Ph.D., an assistant professor of
health education and promotion at the College of Health & Human Performance
at East Carolina University. Becker holds a Ph.D. from Arizona State
University, an M.S. from Ball State University, and a B.S. from Purdue
University. His research interests include positive health, health measurement
and salutogenesis, and his IRAPS topic will delve into salutogenesis.

Other IRAPS 2013 presenters include Mychal Beebe, D.C.; Charles L. Blum, D.C.; Heidi Bockhold,
D.C.; William J. Boro, D.C.; Brigette Bowler, D.C.; Kathryn Conlen, B.A., LMT,
CST; William M. Decken, D.C., LCP; Joe J. Donofrio, D.C., ACP; Roy Floyd, D.C.,
MSPH; Harvey Getzoff, D.C.; John Hart, D.C., MHSc; Joseph D. Heinecke; Haasseem
Hohammed; Adam Klassen, D.C.; Danny Knowles, D.C.; Richelle Knowles, D.C.; Michael
Lenarz, D.C.; Matthew McCoy, D.C., MPH; Vincent L. Perri, D.C., Ph.D.; Ryan
Pollard; Katie Ray, D.C.; Esther M. Remeta, D.C.; Philip R. Schalow, BM, MM,
AS, D.C.; Simon Senzon, M.A., D.C.; Jean E. Thompson, D.C.; Steve Tullius,
D.C., ACP; Jack K. VanDervort, D.C., D.Ph.CS; and H Charles Woodfield, III,
B.S. Pharmacy, D.C.

Registration is open and continuing education credit will be available; for additional information
about the symposium, go to www.sherman.edu/IRAPS.

###

IRAPS PRESENTATIONS:

  • Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia and Chronic Primary
    Migraine in a Patient Undergoing Upper Cervical Chiropractic: A Case
    Report – Mychal Beebe, D.C., Michael Lenarz, D.C., Seattle Upper Cervical
    Research Institute
  • Chiropractic Intervention of Zenker’s Diverticulum: A Case
    Report – Primary Author: William J. Boro, D.C.
  • Three Distinct Lineages That Generate the Skeleton:  The Consideration of Bone Development
    Significance in Early Life Structural Care – Brigette Bowler, D.C., and
    Kathryn Conlen, B.A., LMT, CST
  • Creating Postive Health: It’s More Than Risk Reduction – Craig
    Becker, Ph.D., CWP.
  • Salutogenesis 30 Years Later: Where Do We Go From Here? – Craig
    Becker, Ph.D., CWP
  • Chiropractic in a Vitalistic, Patient-Centered Wellness
    Program – William M. Decken, D.C., LCP
  • Adjustment vs. Manipulation: History, Semantics &
    Implications for the Future – Joe J. Donofrio, D.C., ACP
  • Health Promotion and Prevention Practice in a Chiropractic
    Teaching Outpatient Clinic: A Continuing Study to Determine if Patient
    File Auditing Reflects Active Health and Wellness Advice – Roy Floyd, D.C.,
    MSPH
  • The Relationship of Cranial Facial Growth and Development
    to the Sacro Occipital Technique (SOT) Category System: Three Case Studies
    – Primary Author: Harvey Getzoff, D.C.
  • The Role of the Atlas Vertebrae in the Sacro Occipital Technique
    (SOT) Category System – Primary Author: Harvey Getzoff, D.C.
  • Resting Pulse Rates in Chiropractic Student Patients
    Versus the General Population – John Hart, D.C., MHSc
  • Thermal Pattern Analysis of Forehead and Mastoid Fossa
    Temperature Differentials Using a Single Probe Thermometer: A Case Study –
    John Hart, D.C., MHSc
  • Improvement in the Quality of Life of a Patient with
    Aicardi Syndrome Undergoing Multiple Forms of Chiropractic Care: A
    Retrospective Case Study – Primary Author: Joseph D. Heinecke
  • Upper Cervical Management of Patient with Low Back Pain,
    Bilateral Leg Numbness and Depression: A Case Presentation – Adam Klassen,
    D.C., Michael Lenarz, D.C., Seattle Upper Cervical Research Institute
  • Reduction of a Lumbar Scoliosis & Improved Cervical
    Curve in a Geriatric Patient Following Network Spinal Analysis™ Care: A
    Case Study – Katie Ray, D.C., Danny Knowles, D.C., and Richelle Knowles,
    D.C.
  • Reduction of Vertebral Subluxations Utilizing Chiropractic
    Biophysics® (CBP®) Protocol with Improvement in Sagittal Alignment as Well
    as Improvement in Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease: A Case Report – Haasseem
    Hohammed
  • Please add Matt McCoy
  • Vertebral Subluxation Research: An Agenda to Explore the
    Epidemiology of Vertebral Subluxation and the Clinical Outcomes Related to
    its Management – Matthew McCoy, D.C., MPH
  • Topic TBD – Simon Senzon, M.A., D.C.
  • Conjugate Gaze Visceral Release in Female Chronic Pelvic
    Pain: A Case Study – Primary Author: Vincent L. Perri, D.C., Ph.D.
  • Chiropractic Care and its Effects on a Patient with a
    Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) – Primary Author: Ryan Pollard; Secondary
    Author: Charles L. Blum, D.C.
  • Chiropractic Sacro Occipital Technique (SOT) and Cranial
    Treatment Model for Traumatic Brain Injury along with Monitoring and
    Supplementing for Neurotransmitter Balance: A Case Report – Primary
    Author: Esther M. Remeta, D.C.; Secondary Author: Charles L. Blum, D.C.
  • Chiropractic Management of Overuse Syndrome in a Violist –
    Philip R. Schalow, BM, MM, AS, D.C.
  • Review of Four Cases using SOT/CMRT on Equine and Canine –
    Primary Author:  Jean E. Thompson, D.C.;
    Secondary Author: Heidi Bockhold, D.C.
  • The Future of Vertebral Subluxation Research and Public
    Awareness – Steve Tullius, D.C., ACP
  • A Case for Chiropractic Theory as a Viable Instrument of
    Education and Practicing the Chiropractic Paradigm – Jack K. VanDervort, D.C.,
    D.Ph.CS
  • Detecting an Atlas Subluxation Through Pulse Oximetry – H
    Charles Woodfield, III, B.S. Pharmacy, D.C.

Get Philosophical with ACP

Academy of Chiropractic Philosophers (ACP)

New Classes for 2015-16

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Rhode Island ACP

Rhode Island ACP

ACP Rhode Island
Register Here Online
July 2015 – August 2016
Information and dates here.  (pdf)
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ACP Europe

ACP Europe

ACP Europe
Frankfurt,  Florence,  Amsterdam, Barcelona,
and Sherman College

Register  here online
August 2015– July 2016
Information and dates here. (pdf)
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Email dcordero@sherman.edu for more information or contact Director of Continuing Education Debbie Cordero , 864-578-8770 x 229

[su_quote cite=”Frank Sanford, D.C., A.C.P. ” url=”https://www.facebook.com/Sherman.ACP”]Even if you went through one of the world’s best philosophy courses at your chiropractic college, the ACP course is a step up and beyond. If you did NOT have a proper philosophy course at your college, then the ACP is a MUST! Learn the essence upon which your profession is founded from the masters of chiropractic philosophy today! A once in a lifetime opportunity.[/su_quote]

Challenge your thinking process and apply the principles of philosophy in the chiropractic profession.  The Academy of Chiropractic Philosphers graduate program is designed for those seeking to deepen their understanding of chiropractic. The one-year course will challenge and inspire you to learn and think more than ever about chiropractic philosophy and its relationship to the above-down-inside-out world view.

The world has changed considerably in the past 100 years.

  • Study the validity of the 33 principles even with many developments in science and technology and examine them for relevance.
  • Re-visit the reasoning process and compare mechanistic and vitalistic thought.
  • Evaluate their relevance and application as you listen, question and synthesize current thinking in biology, chiropractic research, adaptability, ethics and professional identity in the practical application of chiropractic philosophy.

See below for some of the topics participants have researched.

Recent ACP Classes

ACP-Australia 2014

ACP Australia 2014

ACP Australia 2014

(l-r) Phil McMaster, Bill Decken, Cameron Staggard, Craig Foote, Stuart Shadwell, Bret Hansell, Paul Finn, Graham Dobson. Luke Stone, Andy Crozier, Brad Atkinson and Michael Troy.

The Australia ACP was held primarily in Sydney. Participants say that a common thread among the ACP groups is that they develop good friendships with the others in the group to be nurtured going forward.

Research Topics from ACP Australia

  1. The 33 Principles…A Patient Education Pathway from Philosophy to Wellness
  2. Chiropractic: Divergent Futures 2025
  3. An Exploration of the Universe, Biological Life and Chiropractic Through the Principles of Organization & Perspective
  4. Chiropractic Technique and Survival Values
  5. What is the Big Idea? Why Do Some People ‘Get It’ and Others Become Medipractors?
  6. Chiropractic Crossroads
  7. B.J.’s Utopia
  8. The Chiropractic Objective
  9. Medical Education vs Chiropractic Wisdom: How a Medically-Oriented Education Cannot Lead to Chiropractic Wisdom
  10. Vitalism, Particularly as It Relates to the Education and Practice of Chiropractic in Modern Times

ACP Sweden 2014

ACP Mentors and Graduates at IRAPS 2014

ACP Mentors and Graduates at IRAPS 2014

ACP Mentors and Graduates at IRAPS 2014: Ron Castellucci (m), Hakan Pilfalck (Sweden), Nicklas Wagner (Sweden), Caroline Lagerloff (Sweden), Mitzi Schwartzbauer (m), Jaime Pinillos (Spain), Frank Sandberg (Sweden), Damaris Lanjopoulos (Norway), Carsten Reinhardt (Germany), Judy Campanale (m), Danny Constable (Germany), Tobias Melin (Sweden), Jakob Petersen-Klingberg (Sweden), Thom Gelardi (guest), Andreas Soderstrom (Sweden), Richard Plummer (guest),  Joe Strauss (m), Wes Mullen, (m), Felicia Stewart (m), Bill Decken (m), Joe J Donofrio (m), Brian Dooley (m), Jack Vandervort (m), Terry Vandervort (m).

Research Topics from ACP-Sweden

  1. Philosophy as a Strategy for Chiropractic to Differentiate in a Commodity Market
  2. The Scientific Basis for the Chiropractor’s Role In Salutogenesis
  3. An Analysis of How the Chiropractic Adjustment Affects the Brain and Its Relation to the Chiropractic Normal Complete Cycle and Simple Cycle
  4. Is It Possible to Communicate Chiropractic Philosophy when Coming from an Allopathic Paradigm?
  5. The Development of my Practice in Congruency with the Straight Chiropractic Philosophy
  6. The “Chiropractic Lifestyle”: What is it? Does the Use of the Term Create Confusion in The Understanding Of Chiropractic?
  7. Therapeutic or Non-Therapeutic, That is the Question
  8. Is Chiropractic a Vitalistic Profession?
  9. Compare and Contrast Chiropractic and Medical Philosophy from a Metaphysical and Epistemological Perspective
  10. Science and Methodology in the Philosophy of Chiropractic: A Praxeological Approach
14th Annual IRAPS

14th Annual IRAPS

Sherman College Gathers Leaders in Philosophy and Research for 14th Annual IRAPS, October 7-8 Sherman College of Chiropractic will host the 14th Annual International Research and Philosophy Symposium (IRAPS), a peer-reviewed conference on vertebral subluxation...
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