technique classChiropractic Today

Chiropractic grew rapidly under the guidance of D. D. Palmer’s son, B.J., who developed the theory and art of chiropractic, laying the groundwork for contemporary practice. B.J. Palmer’s goal was to create a systematic way to objectively locate and analyze vertebral subluxations and to verify the changes that occur when vertebrae become subluxated and when the vertebral subluxation is corrected or put back into its place.

Chiropractic has come a long way in 100-plus years. It has evolved into a highly developed science and art which focuses on the correction of vertebral subluxation and its effect on the body’s natural striving toward health. Digital chiropractic x-rays, thermographic instruments and other technological and scientific advances help chiropractors best serve their patients.

At Sherman College, our focus is teaching our students to be highly skilled in analyzing and correcting vertebral subluxations.

  • D. D. Palmer and B. J. Palmer

    D.D. Palmer

    The Beginning
    It all started in the late 1800s with a simple attempt to move a misaligned vertebra back into place. Daniel David (D. D.) Palmer, a magnetic healer, was the person who realized and documented the connection of the misaligned vertebra causing a loss of health. Palmer is credited with starting and naming this new profession called chiropractic.

    Making the Connection

    Though chiropractic itself is a relatively new health care profession, many of its vitalistic principles date back thousands of years. It was Palmer who revealed the relationship among the nerve system, the vertebrae and the expression of health. Palmer reasoned that a vertebra that was even slightly misaligned could cause pressure on the spinal cord or small spinal nerves, thus changing the messages carried by them. In this state, the body becomes less able to function and maintain its own health. He B.J. Palmercalled this misalignment and interference a vertebral subluxation. His work was continued by his son, B. J. Palmer.

    After correcting the position of the vertebra in his patient’s neck, Palmer witnessed the restoration of spinal integrity, a dramatic change in his patient's health and the birth of a profession.

    Chiropractic has come a long way in 100-plus years. It is now a highly regarded health care profession used by hundreds of thousands of individuals.

    Chiropractic grew rapidly under the guidance of D. d. Palmer's son, B.J., who developed the theory and art of chiropractic, laying the groundwork for contemporary practice. B.J. Palmer's goal was to create a systematic way to objectively locate and analyze vertebral subluxations and to verify the changes that occur when vertebrae become subluxated and when the vertebral subluxation is corrected or put back into its place.

  • Sherman College History

    Dr. Lyle Sherman

    The college is named for a pioneer in the development of modern chiropractic and former assistant director of the B.J. Palmer Chiropractic Research Clinic in Davenport, Iowa. Dr. Sherman moved to Spartanburg in 1954 to start a private practice in a location close to mountains and beaches.

    Established January 11,1973, Sherman College was founded by Dr. Thom Gelardi. He embraced the philosophy of chiropractic and wanted to ensure that its principles prospered and were preserved for future generations. With the help of a chiropractic advisory board comprised of some of the most knowledgeable and respected chiropractors from around the world, Dr. Gelardi created Sherman College.

    The college occupied two temporary facilities before building at its current location on Springfield Road in 1977. The college campus encompasses 80 acres.

    Sherman College has had five presidents, beginning with Dr. Gelardi, from 1973 until 1996, followed by Dr. David Koch, 1997-2000. Dr. Jerry Hardee served from 2001-2005, and Dr. Gelardi was interim president from 2006-2007. Dr. Jon Schwartzbauer, served from 2007-2012. Dr. Edwin Cordero took the reins as the college's fifth president 2013.

    The Scallon Building was constructed first. Sherman added two more academic buildings--the E.C. Taylor Building to house the Chiropractic Health Center and the Olsen Building to accommodate a growing student population, which includes a classroom and a workout center.

    The college holds full accreditation from the Council on Chiropractic Education, and its graduates practice all across the country and around the world.

  • Historic First Adjustment 1895

    Harvey Lillard

    Let’s go back in time to Davenport, Iowa, in 1878. Here we find a janitor named Harvey Lillard working in a stooped, cramped position. He felt something “pop” in his neck. A few days later his hearing was gone.

    Seventeen years passed in silence. Then, on September 18, 1895, Lillard related his story to Daniel David Palmer, a magnetic healer who practiced in the Ryan Building where Lillard worked.

    Palmer felt and saw a bump in the area where Lillard said he had felt the pop. Reasoning that this bump was one of the spinal column’s 26 vertebrae out of line, Palmer persuaded Lillard to let him try to move it back to its normal position. When he did, there was another pop, and the bump was gone. In a few days, Lillard regained his hearing. Thus, chiropractic was born on September 18, 1895.

    Sherman's first class graduated on September 18, 1976, the anniversary of the discovery of chiropractic.

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